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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
when we saw a deficit and policy toion is being designed rebalance the economy's and we're seeing that happen. while the trade deficits are coming down, the demand for products from emerging markets, whether commodities or manufactured goods, that demand is not growing as fast as it was when trade deficits were expanding. the markets are going to find the environment stuff. what is the concern china or deflation? >> i don't think there will be deflation and i think we will see a long time of low growth. i don't think inflation will be a problem. of alarm also it's bells and i like to put the word demand in front of deflation. and thatalling wages means following command and a negative spiral. it is not just falling prices. is lots of sectors. you see groups and things like that. falling realu have wages that that is the problem. the cycle that japan went through and if you do not touch it at the right time, it is difficult to turn around. are we in a scenario like that? deflation and the specter of it hanging over us unless handled correctly. >> one of the characteristics of japan
is a distinguished churchman himself talked perfect sense. there is nothing moral about running up huge deficits about out of control welfare bills. if we do not deal with these problems, the whole country will be poorer. we should listen to the former arch bishop of canterbury. he said the churches should be aware of the dangers of blindly defending a gargantuan welfare budget that every serious politician would cut as a matter of economic common sense. i think serious politicians have to engage in it and that should go for everybody. >> ed miliband. >> i join my honorable friend's and congratulate the team on their brilliant performance at the winter olympics. as the immediate threat of flood passes, some levels are still underwater and hundreds of businesses and farms are still struggling to recover. the committee on climate change, the u.k. statistical authority have all said the government investment in flood defenses has fallen. in the light of this, does the prime minister think it is right to revisit the plan for investment in flood defense? >> we will look carefully at the plans. we hav
he is recommending for each show agency and the deficit projections for 10 years. they say it will be low work, but how to make at work. obama will not be including the chain cpi proposal. inflation is measured that would have the effect of lowering social security benefits and other federal benefits. the aarp andsed by liberals in congress. arguing itthat out, was a all a branch for republicans. not willing to do a big deal on the deficit in order to get things under control. by taking that out, they will lose 230 billion or so in deficit reduction. already we know one of the ways will be assuming the senate passes and immigration overall. go much does that cost you these are the kinds of things we will be looking for. perhaps the least effective budgets we have seen in years because congress are it has a toplines appropriations number for this year. they are are ready holding hearings. this is entitlement overhaul out of the midterm. how is the budget actually released today, and to are the surrogates that the white house is sending to capitol hill over the next coming da
? it is contained. we do not think it is a contagion threat. in the so-called double deficit countries, they are quite small in terms of their exposure to the developed market angst. opportunityke this to buy more emerging-market equities right now? intoe you still buying other equity markets, more developed markets in the u.s. and eurozone? >> it depends on your timeframe. over the next six months, i don't see a lot of triggers that will send the emerging markets story into a by scenario. i would be cautious. the valuation discount is about 30% and that is attractive. and lot of contagion risk that is psychology with the ukraine and other stories is scary so i would be cautious to neutral on emerging markets right now. have thena does not risk of contagion, you mentioned the fragile five, which might present a risk when we talk about the contagion to emerging markets? >> i don't think any of the fragile five are a risk in the developed markets for a couple reasons. they are tiny. take argentina and venezuela and put them together, less than half a point of global gdp. they are really
moral about running up huge deficits, about out of control welfare bills. if we don't deal with these problems the whole country will be poor. i think we should listen to the words of george carey, the former archbishop of canterbury who said this. the churches should be aware of the dangers of blindly defending a gargantuan welfare budget that increases politician would cut as a matter of economic common sense. i think serious politicians have to engage in this and that should go for everybody. >> ed miliband. [shouting] >> mr. speaker, i join my honorable friend and the prime minister in congratulating team gb on a brilliant performance at the window limits but as the threat of floods passes there's thousands out of their homes. some are still underwater and hundreds of businesses and farms are still struggling to recover. the committee on climate change, the house of commons library and the uk statistical authority have all now said that government investment and flood defenses has fallen. in the light of this an event we have seen, does the prime minister think it's rig
are often protected and many nato member states are serving as identify a deficit the military training areas throughout europe and north america are among the richest and most important sites will find that their city. often because they are that it's not open to the general . but also because if i am mental awareness and why stick to good use of natural resources is encouraged among soldiers military training areas are increasingly recognized as sites of high biodiversity and large numbers of threatened and endangered species. exports from india its beans and nine. listen to it in fooling you into watching it in two thousand that the ufc is the main import of indian spices contributed sixteen points and up until the next week i fly to a site i know that nine percent annually and maybe share each week six but since it's sunday a baby on the menu she jumped on singapore and the uk. i don't need to destinations for beginning sports it is that the european union to open them on this commendable that the ongoing sovereign debt crisis and four great books despite these problems from the out
that the russian budget is experiencing is that they are having an expanding deficit at $110 a barrel. if we go back several years, they're doing rather well balancing the budget at $60 a barrel. every single increased difficulty in funding export into what is the kremlin our needs and that is a full flow of finance. >> how much substitution can there be? are there ways around the situation? >> no. the energy crisis in the ukraine will become acute and quickly. , thered no difficulty was an arrangement that had been set up between ukraine and russian gas prom -- and russian azprom. there were supposed to be an extension of credit. all of that is over. it is back to cash on the barrel head and ukraine cannot afford to buy natural gas. an lngalking about terminal outside of odessa, but that will not particularly help. one problem people have not really looked at yet is the ukrainians, like a number of people in europe, have been relying on toward coal to offset the natural gas pricing situation. there are some reverberations this morning from the netscape onetsk. internally, we are having an ene
differentiate as i look the key issue for me is who is dealing with a budget deficit or who is not raising interest rates. what is the critical issue for you? willdonesia for example mark itself out as different from the others. elsewhere,ine and don't be too concentrated in emerging markets. political risk is large and it is not very well-predicted by investors. do be well diversified. take some overweight and underweight positions. we tend to be overweight the small countries and underweight the largest ones. underweight the brics historically. that can be difficult when china is on a strong rally. good stead over the long term. >> what is going on in china? i come in everyday, we have the yuan on the move, we are trying to lure him the currency? there is something very interesting in the past couple of weeks in china. >> they have to squeeze the excess is out of the system and it is going to be painful. we talked about volatility earlier. we can expect that to spike up later in the year. there is going to be some headline news out of china as this credit excess is squeezed. i think the
. cutting spending and raising revenues. really important is reform. a lot of the budget deficit is because ukraine has a very high energy subsidies. it pays a fifth of the import price. energy has to rise as well. that's really, really important. it is important for getting rid of corruption. other bits are likely to be stabilization. that's the good news. the final bit is banking sector reform. the exchange rate when it weakens will credit a big hole and that one needs to be filled. >>> take a look at this, would you? is this the future of aviation? investors behind this giant airship believe it could revolutionize oil exploration to disaster relief operations. it will be able to lift 50 tons of cargo. it has been sold back to the british firm. it has won the financial backing of one of britain's most success rock stars as richard wescott has been finding out. >> reporter: inside britain's big of aircraft hangar, something is growing. beating into life the world's longest flying machine. looks like an airship, but it isn't because it doesn't float. what you can see from here is that uniqu
and it was his 126th goal at the new camp equaling the home record. and they reduced the deficit for a header. and barsa two other goals came from later in the second half. defender calis and a curler from hernandez stealing the victory and they move barsa into second, i'm richard with al jazeera. >> reporter: dropped points in the chase for a championship and they were held and the penalty was cancelled out. and he stays fifth. and a city manager manual has domestic trouble after they won the english lead cup and it was 3-1 at london stadium and they went through and they sealed the victimry through second half goals. >> translator: the first half was difficult. but it was necessary to remember sunderlund beat chelsea and manchester united and we had to wait because it was difficult but a victory in the final was victory in the final and not a favorite and we won this year and did the work necessary and the fact we didn't win last year was because we didn't do the work needed. >> reporter: in italy syria has gone 11 points clear of second place roma and beat milan 2-nil thanks to goals an
reduced the deficit, two other goals came from two of their stalwarts late in the second half. defender car carlos pulo, richad barth al jazeera. >> it was a thrilling final round at the honda classic in florida where the title was decided in a four man playoff. tiger woods began seven shows behind, but he was forced to withdraw with a back injury. double bogey, four-over 74, missed the eagle putt, for the final hole of the outright win. henley, only second pag victory. >> it was a rush to be out there, playing with rory. i've never played or bean part of the crowd so big. it was just an amazing feeling. i feel like i kind of got them going and it was so much fun. i hope i can have a bunch more sundays just hike that in my career. >> i didn't -- like that in my career. >> i didn't play well enough to deserve the tournament. just wasn't in control. my golf ball coming down the stretch. but you know still had a chance to win the tournament, didn't quite do it, and just had an awkward distance from my second in the playoff and a couple of awkward lies, couldn't make birdie but it's been a
's ever proposed for, not for reducing deficit but more domestic spending. we've had huge spending increases, so those are such nonstarters, i don't see how you get common ground. granted, we're living under another budget agreement for now. but it's clear he's moving farther to the left to try and -- for those reasons and he's not trying to move to the middle. >> congressman, you said that three times, he's moved to the left, it's a nonstarter. does that mean i can't ask you about closing loopholes or -- >> yeah, sure, go ahead. >> are there any ways in which you all could maybe come to something and end up with one or two or three of these things and get some of the things that you want? >> yeah, so we just -- our chairman of the ways and means committee, dave camp, put out a specific discussion draft of tax reform, which does just that. it closes loopholes. instead of using the money for spending which increases the deficit -- he has $1.8 trillion in tax increases, half goes for spending. we're saying take the loophole closures and use it to lower tax rates to grow the economy.
're right, there are issues out there. i think it's more about deficit spending where they'll try to earn -- try to get janet yellen to see how far she'll go politically. greenspan a little bit more of a political animal. ben bernanke saying we'll not weigh in on that stuff and we don't know where janet yellen comes down, and saying do you know what, you need to bring down the deficits, how you do it is your problem. >> it raises questions about unemployment. that's the sticking point. that's what investors and traders want to hear from her, the whole issue of forward guidance. if you were still there, what would you recommend? how would you switch policy to get away from the 6 1/2 percent unemployment threshold? >> they've been burned. no other way to put it they've been burned on the 6.5% marker, whatever you want to call it, threshold and they'll back away from that. i would think that janet yellen would want to make maximum use of what will be a honeymoon period. i don't think that anybody is going to be going really after her hard. it's too early to do that. and there's nothing reall
term on trying to boost job growth. over the ten-year window you will see steadily declining deficits. at the end the period i think you'll see a declining debt-to-gdp ratio. that's the right trajectory. >> yesterday we had warren buffett on the program. he said he thinks the proposal would be to boost the earned income tax credit even more, expand that in a bigger way. that's a way to boost wages for people that are working without looking at job losses by raising the minimum wage. how about offering it to a wider variety of people and taking the minimum wage proposal off the table? >> these things are not mutually exclusive. there's no reason you can't work at both ends here. >> is it something you would offer if you did a broad -- not what you're talking about right now, but boosting the income tax credit in a big way, offering it across the aisle as a way of finding compromise, in instead of looking at one from another. i think that would be something republicans would take on heartily. >> we're willing to consider any ideas republicans put on the table. the president is putting t
a dime to the deficit. >> the president also wants to expand the earned income tax credit for the working poor without children. his budget would also expand the child and dependent care tax credit and create automatic iras to help workers save for retirement but it's unlikely those plans will get through congress. he needs legislation to enact all of that and that does not look likely. >>> global markets are rebounding today as investors digest the situation in ukraine. even the dow jones flew out of the gate this morning. alison kosik is over at the new york stock exchange. how much have we bounced back today? >> quite a bit. what a difference a day makes. even the s&p 500 at a record high. the dow up 200 points, 205 points. all 30 stocks in the dow are in the green. very different story yesterday. it was a sea of red. we also saw that turn-around happening overseas, all the way -- there were those down arrows we saw yesterday in europe, asia, russia, they all turned up today. analysts say investors today aren't on red alert. it's not such a dire situation. i think when putin spoke and
on the largest deficit is one that is pretty sudden. they will behind going with the smaller parties and it is like a game of cricket. but they really want to see is to find the stable location that will bring in certainty and bring it back to the table. we will see that by the 16th of may. the upcomingout indian elections. >> when we come back, we will hear more about microsoft and the somebody who knows a thing or two about it. stay with us here on "countdown." ♪ >> welcome back to "countdown." microsoft former chief executive steve ballmer speaking one month after leaving the tech giant and bloomberg was there. for more, let's bring in caroline hyde with the details on what was a fascinating evening. >> wait for it. wait for it. there, on the bottom right. >> bloomberg presents the oxford union debate. with bloomberge having this relationship with the oxford union and he was fascinating. this is the first time he was x ceo. speak as the he is still on the board and one of the bigger shareholders but no longer running a. he spoke very eloquently about the concern that he did not
loopholes as a part of a compromise approach dealing with our media and the long-term deficit challenge is. so yes the president will talk about why it's so important for democrats to advance an agenda that is focused on expanding opportunities for all. and as he has and i have as well it is certainly worth noting in the contrast, and he will again tonight with an agenda that is focused on protecting the loopholes and prerogatives of the wealthiest and the well-connected and again from expanding or protecting the opportunity for a few. >> it sounds like a campaign. when you say opportunit see oppa few yesterday you were saying the chairman proposal has had some good potential to it. >> and they rallied around it. >> the president met earlier this weekend talked about immigration reform. >> obviously the president, like all republican leaders including those running for office themselves, is engaging in political events and he will be supportive in many ways a democrat either running for the reelection or office in this cycle. in the meantime that he is principally focused on advancing an a
to this aid. difficult steps need to be undertaken to right size gas prices and trim budget deficits, but ukraine should be given a long enough lease so that these necessary reforms don't strangle a nation today dealing with threats to its very existence. second cry me i can't. -- crimea. they have invaded and the very accord they signed guaranteeing crimea's territory. no doubt president putin was sore and no doubt he didn't like the fact that the united states voiced its strong support for the right of a sovereign ukraine to make independent decisions about its future partnerships and no doubt he is infuriated that the ukrainian people are now on their way to getting their way. but this is not a schoolyard. you don't get to push around weaker kids just because you don't like them. this is the 21st century. the reason we belong to organizations like the united nations or the reason we negotiate treaties like the budapest memorandum is because we now understand, after centuries of european war, how destabilizing this kind of behavior is. the irony for russia, of course, is that this
so we expect the lira, the current deficit is an issue in turkey and we expect the currency to remain weak so we have to consider that when making investment proposals, we have to assume a little bit of, not a currency strengthening anyway, probably weakening if anything and brazil is a problem for currency from that point of view and equally as a sterling uk investor we find the dollar quite cheap so we find u.s. assets quite interesting at the moment. what goes around comes around i guess. >> reporter: thank you very much for joining us. julia, that is from here. we'll be back in an hour with another interview. for now pack over to you. >> thank you, great to chat to you. >>> the bitcoin exchange mt. gox received a subpoena from prosecutors in new york, asked the company to preserve certain documents. ceo mark capellas issued a statement saying the business is at a turning point. japanese authorities are looking into the matter but don't have jurisdiction after the mt. gox website went down. >>> still to come, the british economy returns to focus as investors await the second meetin
. it was about $11 billion in deficit this year. the new government in kiev said the country is going to need about $35 billion over the next two years just to survive. the i.m.s. is working on a plan along with the european union and united states, saying they're going to try and help but can't do anything until there is a government in place because an official government hahas to those kind of requests and the e.u. and i.m.f. can't negotiate with anything other than official governments. they need a prim minister, a cabinet and that's all underway. it's supposed to be in place by thursday but still a long road ahead for ukraine. >> all right, jennifer glasse in ukraine, thank you very much. in our next hour, we will be taking a closer look at ukraine's former prime minister and her role in shape that go countries future. these are live images coming out of parliament in ukraine and as you can see, the tensions there still exist. also viktor yanukovych still a man on the run. >> the u.s. state department is expelling three venezuelan diplomats, just days after a group of american officials
growing deficit. it to exacerbate the problem for even illegals to get scholarships driver's licenses it asco is true reagan conservative? >> he dealt with as the california governor but i go over this in the book. he granted amnesty to reach huge number of illegal immigrants in the 1980's. 1986. he used the argument it provides a valuable source of labor that not many but will take with a classic argument that you here today he granted amnesty but at the same time and exchange for what he plusses promised of tighter border security that would allow people to enter the country legally for kozo what reagan did was right to put the follow-up never took place. that border security was not provided. the piece by peter robinson wrote for "the wall street journal" like what would reagan to? it is strongly recommended. any of their questions? do i get the hook. [laughter] it must be the parade that i gave him. [laughter] >> i have been waiting for this opportunity. [laughter] [applause] >> host: peniel joseph, who is this? >> he was born onje 24 board and stokely carmichael june 29, 1941 in
that had obviously unsustainable balance of payment situations and that had current account deficits and that needed to have some kind of sell-off to rebalance and other countries where the fundamentals were fine. frankly, it seems like those fears weren't born out. i'm wondering what you think of the dynamic now give whatn what happening and in particular whether or not you think that this is going to have contagion effects elsewhere. >> this is an important question. the emerging markets are in the middle of a major capital outflow. i think some of the data shows that there's been money leaving emerging markets for over 15 weeks already now. >> 18. >> 18 weeks. and i think that we shouldn't expect this to change the matters very much. i think rebecca's question was spot on. how much has the russian action over the weekend really changed the macroeconomic situation and i think very little. i think that applies to the emerging markets as an asset class as well. >> but let me say something. it hasn't changed the macrosituation but it has changed the approach to risk. look what's going
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)